Making Your Visitor Shout “That’s for Me!”

Making Your Visitor Shout “That’s for Me!”

Perry Marshall of www.perrymarshall.com shares a wallet-walloping calculation that should convince you to spend a lot of quality time working on
your landing pages: Let’s say you pay 50 cents for a click and Barbara in Oregon goes to your Web site and spends eight seconds seeing what you’re selling . . . then leaves. 50 cents divided by 8 seconds is $225.00 per hour.

Barbara in Oregon’s attention is pretty expensive, wouldn’t you say?

Now, maybe Barbara was never your customer. She clicked because your ad aroused her curiosity, or was cute, or implied or promised something for
nothing. Oh, well, can’t win them all. But most Web site owners are told to be satisfied with conversion percentages that are pathetically low: half a
percent, one percent. The Web is a numbers game, they’re told. Get enough traffic and even a mediocre site can pay the rent. The Web is a numbers game, true. But who says you have to be satisfied with the numbers? The entire premise of AdWords — in fact, the feature that rocketed AdWords past what is now Yahoo! Search Marketing within months of its birth — was the ease with which campaigns could be tested and improved. This improvement doesn’t have to stop at the AdWords border with your Web site. You can deploy the market intelligence you gain by testing keywords and ad copy to create compelling landing pages that continue to attract and guide your best prospects. The goal of each landing page is to build an instant emotional bond with your prospects, show them you understand their needs, and can take away their pains. From that platform, you present your offer and guide them to take action. wideo marketing

Your home page, the one that says, “Welcome to Acme Online Sock Emporium,” is hardly ever the right place to take AdWords traffic. If someone walked into your retail Sock Emporium and told you, “I’m looking for red-andwhite-striped, over-the-calf dress socks,” you wouldn’t take them back to the front door and say, “Welcome to Acme Sock Emporium, for the finest in men’s and ladies’ dress and casual socks; sporting socks; and never-washed, vintage baseball stirrup socks worn by members of the 1958 Championship New York Yankees.” Instead, you’d lead them directly to the wall displaying the red-and-white-striped, over-the-calf dress socks and ask them, “What size?” That level of specificity is the purpose of your landing page. Your retail sock store is probably not located next to other sock stores. But your online store’s landing page is precisely two clicks away from just about every other online sock store in existence. If your landing page doesn’t look like the next point on the shortest distance between your prospect’s A and B, whoosh! Barbara from Oregon is here one second, Oregon the next. (Hah!Chapter 10 and my first pun. My sister owes me a dollar.)